IP Address News

Providing you with a single site about IP Addresses News and Usage

IP Address News - Providing you with a single site about IP Addresses News and Usage

IP addresses in 2014

Geoff Huston has posted his 2014 version of his IP addressing report.  A few notes from within the report.

  •  Cisco, Morgan Stanely, & Gartner predicted that by 2020 there will be between 25 – 75 billion devices on the Internet as the “Internet of things” comes to life with embedded devices all requiring connections.
  • LacNIC, RIPE, and APNIC’s austerity address pools are slated to be depleted between 2017-2021 if current trends continue to hold.
  • IPv4 transfers increased quite dramatically in 2014 with APNIC performing 340 a 220% increase, and RIPE 919 a 600% increase.  RIPE’s increasing transfers seem to be clearly being driven by the lack of needs-basis requirements in the region.
  • LacNIC and RIPE continue to lead the world in IPv6 allocations with 1,208 and 2,218 respectively.

Addressing 2014 – And then there were 2!  (copy)

Measuring IPv6 Adoption

A new look on IPv6 adoption data was recently presented at the SIGCOMM conference in Chicago.  The research, which was a collaboration between multiple groups, looks at over a decade of IPv6 data and notes that some measurements have seen a 400% increase in IPv6 traffic between 2012 and 2013.  The data also shows a significant shift in the type of data toward HTTP & HTTPS content by end-users rather than server to server communication which was observed in earlier in the deployment timeline. Links to the blog article and full paper below…

IPv4 is not enough

Measuring IPv6 Adoption (copy)

Routing table growth causes some hiccups

News reports have been circulating over the past couple of days that various service providers have hit the 512k route mark in their BGP tables on their routers and switches causing outages and other problems.  A number of hardware platforms, notably older Cisco hardware, have default limits in their configurations which limit route tables sizes to 512k routes.  When these limits are breached the older hardware slows down or otherwise stop functioning as expected. Cisco issued a bulletin in May to providers with workaround procedures for some platforms.

The growth in the global route table has been fairly stable over the past couple of years and this is growth has been expected for a long time and yet still Internet service providers were not prepared in time for this event.

Internet Touches Half Million Routes: Outages Possible Next Week

Internet routers hitting 512K limit, some become unreliable

The end of the internet predicted, news at 11

Echoes of Y2K: Engineers Buzz That Internet Is Outgrowing Its Gear

The internet broke yesterday

BGP Analysis Reports

 

Comcast at 1 Tbps of IPv6 native Internet traffic

Comcast has reported that they have fully deployed IPv6 dual-stack across their entire backbone broadband network and are working toward reaching 50% penetration to customers by the end of 2014.  They have also stated that they are now carrying 1 Terabits per second of external to the Internet traffic calling out youtube as one of the primary sites which are using IPv6 natively.

Comcast Reaches Key Milestone in Launch of IPv6

 

NANOG 61 & IPv6

A number of talks at NANOG 61 this week included some updates on IPv6 deployments.  The links below will take you to presentations and also video of the speakers.

 

Akamai produces a security report annually and in their report this year they noted have seen a 10x increase in IPv6 traffic compared with the year before.

2013 Worldwide Infrastructure Security Report

 

T-mobile described their IPv6 deployment for handsets particularly noting how all of their Android 4.3+ handsets are now IPv6 only using 464XLAT as the transition technology back to the IPv4 Internet.  8 million of their 49 million subscribers are now largely using IPv6 only.  Furthermore, they report that 27% of their traffic is IPv6 and that 50% of the traffic from these 8 million handsets is completely IPv6 without any translation to the IPv4 world.

464XLAT: Breaking Free of IPv4

 

I also found these talks quite interesting, but aren’t related directly to addressing issues.

Addressing 2013

Geoff Huston recently released his 2013 IP addressing report.  A few notable details from the report.

  •  Device shipments for 2014 are expected to reach 2.47 Billion, each of those devices will need at least one IP address.
  • The industry continues to show consolidation of Internet numbering resources into the largest service and enterprise providers.
  • Geoff’s exhaustion model has ARIN’s IPv4 exhaustion date occurring with a 80% probability between Sept 2014 – June 2015.  (I personally think it will be sooner rather than later)
  • IPv6 allocations continue to grow with the RIPE region leading the world with 2,149 allocations of 4,018 total allocations in 2013 across all five RIRs.

Geoff concludes with the following insights:

The past three years has been dominated by the mass marketing of mobile internet services, and the growth rates for 2013 perhaps might have been the highest so far recorded were it not for the exhaustion of the IPv4 address pools in the Asia Pacific region and Europe and the Middle East. In address terms this growth is being masked by the use of Carrier Grade NATs in the mobile service provider environment, so that the resultant demands for public addresses in IPv4 are quite low.

Unfortunately no such broad scale of deployment of IPv6 was visible in the address statistics for 2013. This points to a mobile Internet whose continued growth in 2013 remains, for the most part, highly reliant on NATs, and this, in turn, points to some longer term elements of concern for the continued ability of the Internet to support further innovation and diversification in its portfolio of applications and services.

We are witnessing an industry that is no longer using technical innovation, openness and diversification as its primary means of propulsion. The widespread use of NATs limit the technical substrate of the Internet to a very restricted model of simple client/server interactions using TCP and UDP. The use of NATs force the interactions into client-initiated transactions, and the model of an open network with considerable flexibility in the way in which communications took place is no longer being sustained.

Today’s internet is serviced by a far smaller number of very large players, each of whom appear to be assuming a very strong position within their respective markets. The drivers for such larger players tend towards risk aversion, conservatism and increased levels of control across their scope of operation.

Addressing 2013 – That Was The Year That Was  (Copy)

2014 preview and 2013 wrapup

The ARIN region continues to move steadily toward IPv4 exhaustion with the total amount of IPv4 address resources available in the free pool being only 1.4 /8 equivalents as of February 3rd, 2014.  It seems very likely that the region will exhaust its free pool of IPv4 numbers by mid-2014.

With the coming exhaustion, a number of community members have submitted policy proposals dealing with a number of exhaustion issues.  ARIN has recently published these new draft policies and they are now open for discussion.

The RIPE region continues to move toward removing “need” (RIPE policy 2013-3) as a requirement for an IPv4 address assignment or allocation.  The working-group chairs recently forwarded the policy to the RIPE NCC for implementation.

In IPv6 news, Comcast’s continues their aggressive deployment of IPv6 and reported in late 2013 that 25% of their Internet customers are now provisioned with dual stack and plans to complete their IPv6 deployment in 2014.  Comcast also noted that they had reached the 75% deployment throughout their broadband network.  Additional commentary on other cable MSOs can be found here.

At the end of the year, the New York Times also published an intriguing interview with Vint Cerf and Robert Kahn about the future of the Internet entitled, Viewing Where the Internet Goes.

IPv6 Deployment in the UK

I was pointed to this report from OfCom, the UK communications regulator, through this commentary.

The report is dated 2012 and has some interesting statistics comparing the deployment of IPv6 in various countries.

I found the following quote (emphasis mine) from the report interesting as I read through.

The report finds that by any measure, the UK lags behind its peers in IPv6 deployment. Whether in comparison with; economies of a similar size, G20 and EU member states, or with Asian economies, the UK is behind in IPv6 adoption.  IPv4 address exhaustion and a failure to transition to IPv6 has a significant impact on innovation as it is the essential building block for any technology that connects to the Internet. Failure to keep up with competitor economies will have an impact on the UK’s consumer access to broadband, on eGovernment, […]

The report includes a brief discussion of the IPv4 exhaustion & transfer market, IPv6 deployment experiences, and deployment costs.

Internet Protocol Version 6 Deployment Study  (copy)

IPv6 Deployment Survey

The NRO has posted a new survey of IPv6 Deployments worldwide.

A few highlights that I noted while reading through the survey report.

  • The survey includes responses from 1515 respondents from 131 countries
  • 61% of respondents still indicate issues with vendor support
  • Cost and business case as a factor to not deploy IPv6 continues to drop
  • IPv4 run-out appears to be a driver to deploy IPv6 according to some respondents
  • Biggest issues to IPv6 deployment continue to be user demand & technical problems
  • The number of respondents using or planning to use CGN (Carrier grade NAT) is increasing from 15% in 2012 to 18% in 2013

IPv6 Deployment Survey   (copy)